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James and Ashley are staying at home. Partly because there’s a pandemic, partly because they’re writers, and partly because of their health. Through discussions and interviews, they explore the big questions: how do books get written? How do people live with chronic illness? And just what ARE you reading?

Ashley Kalagian Blunt is author of two books, How to Be Australian, a memoir, and My Name Is Revenge, a thriller novella and collected essays. My Name is Revenge was a finalist in the 2018 Carmel Bird Digital Literary Award, and was shortlisted for the 2019 Woollahra Digital Literary Awards. Her writing appears in Griffith Review, Sydney Review of Books, The Australian, The Big Issue, Westerly, Kill Your Darlings and more. She lives and works in Sydney, NSW. Find her on Twitter and Instagram or visit her website.

James McKenzie Watson won the 2021 Penguin Literary Prize for his novel Denizen, which also received a 2021 Varuna Residential Fellowship and 2021 KSP Fellowship, and was highly commended for the 2020 Writing NSW Varuna Fellowships. His short fiction has been recognised in competitions including the International InkTears Flash Fiction Contest and the Grieve Writing Competition, and featured in publications such as Baby Teeth Journal and Brave Voices Magazine. He works as a nurse in regional NSW. Find him on Twitter and Instagram or visit his website.

Ashley Kalagian Blunt and James McKenzie Watson

Jan 19, 2021

In this special crossover episode, James and Ashley interview Dani Vee from the Words and Nerds podcast and vice versa. It's a fascinating conversation about podcasting, health, reading, and why we're all doing what we're doing. 

This conversation is being simultaneously released as an episode of Words and Nerds. Big...


Jan 5, 2021

James and Ashley interview Nardi Simpson, Yuwaalaraay musician and author of 'Song of the Crocodile.' In it, they discuss Nardi's transition from writing lyrics to prose, the preservation of Indigenous languages, and the importance of non-Indigenous Australians accepting that some elements of Indigenous culture are not...